Polygraph News

 Home / Polygraph news

Lie Detection In The News

Polygraph Unbeatable, Says California Psychologist.

Woodland Hills, CA, /PRNewswire/ -- "Almost no human being can beat a polygraph test," says Dr. Louis Rovner, a noted psychologist and polygraph expert in California. In fact, lie detection technology has become so sophisticated that a polygraph can now detect a person's efforts to try to beat the test.


In a recent Deputy Sheriff Magazine article, Dr. Rovner writes that there are several books and pamphlets available on the Internet which claim to teach people how to beat a polygraph test. None of these, he says, can do what they claim.


Dr. Rovner feels that the idea of beating a polygraph test after reading a short book is absurd. "This is about the same as saying that you will be able to perform a Beethoven Piano Concerto at Carnegie Hall by simply reading a book about piano playing." The interplay between the sophisticated technology of the polygraph, the experience of the examiner, and the involuntary physiological reactions of the subject is so complex that almost no one can look truthful on the polygraph when he is actually lying.


"Beating the polygraph," says Rovner, "is impossible for most people." The polygraph is a scientific instrument which records physiological changes in our bodies. Polygraph examiners are trained to look for subtle abnormalities in these changes as a person answers a series of questions. The changes are involuntary reactions that occur in our bodies when we are not being truthful. "In order to beat the test," he says, "a person must use his central nervous system to override the involuntary activity of the autonomic nervous system, and he must do it on cue." Given the anxiety of a typically polygraph subject, it is extremely unlikely that anyone could successfully fool the polygraph.


Scientific research into polygraph accuracy has been going on for more than 40 years. "Overall," says Dr. Rovner, "we are confident that polygraph tests have a 96% accuracy rate when done properly." That statement is backed up by hundreds of research studies and experiments. Rovner's own published research shows that people cannot beat a polygraph test simply by reading about it.


Source: Rovner & Associates



Prosecutors Drop Grant County Teacher's Child Seduction Charge After Polygraph Test

CONVERSE, Ind. - A Grant County teacher is no longer facing a child seduction charge following a polygraph test. Hueston was arrested on that charge in February after a 16-year-old girl accused him of fondling and touching her in the summer of 2016. Prosecutors say Hueston denied the charge and pleaded not guilty.


State police later administered a lie detector test that found that Hueston "truthfully answered the relevant question." The results of the test led prosecutors to drop the charge Tuesday.


"We were convinced that we could never carry our burden of proof in the case," said a prosecutor. "Therefore, the only reasonable and correct course of action was to dismiss the charge." Prosecutors say they do not plan on charging the teen with false reporting since there is no evidence that they have seen to prove that she lied to police.


"By itself, the polygraph examination report is not proof that the child lied," said a prosecutor. "Of course, the polygraph result is not admissible in any trial other than Mr. Hueston's trial."


Hueston was placed on administrative leave from Oak Hill High School as a result of his arrest. It's unclear at this time if or when he will be reinstated. The Oak Hill United School Corporation says it is aware that Hueston's charge has been dropped. That information will be considered at a school board meeting in June.


Source: www.cbs4indy.com



1974 Case of Teen Burned Alive had a Suspect, but Never an Arrest

David L. Eyman, 15 at the time of his death, was reported to have been found smoldering in a southern Kansas City ditch, bound at his hands and feet. The Kansas City Police unit investigating the case suspected the Raytown officer who found Eyman had killed the teen. The officer was never charged in the case and later moved to central Kansas.


Eyman was burned alive Aug. 14, 1974, and found tied up "similar to the way a steer might be bound in a rodeo," according to The Star at the time. A small amount of pot was found in his back pocket, though his wallet was missing. His body was unrecognizable from the burns. He was later identified by a silver-and-turquoise ring and by matching a fingerprint.


The investigation into Eyman's death was handled by the 25-person Metropolitan Major Case Squad for nine days, longer than the five days that was typical at the time. Before the case was handed off to the crimes against persons unit, and then declared a cold case, the Metro Squad interviewed the Raytown officer. The officer had reported Eyman's burning body around 3:45 a.m. to the Kansas City Police Department, rather than to the Raytown police chief, as he had been instructed. For that, he was later fired.


Because the officer had a record of discovering more fires of suspicious origin than any other law enforcement officer in the area, he was called in for questioning about the murder. Unnamed sources within the Metro Squad told The Star in 1979 they thought the Raytown officer had murdered Eyman.


The strongest evidence to support the belief was the result of a polygraph test indicating the officer was involved in the murder, according to the 1979 Star report. Missouri law required both parties to consent to the admission of those results in court, so the case never went forward.


In 1979, a Star reporter interviewed the officer. He denied involvement with the crime, saying "there was nothing to confess to." He described himself as a "dedicated officer," and said his record of finding suspicious fires was due to his work ethic.


Source: www.kansascity.com



Ex-Fort Myers Police Chief Fired for Lying Takes Polygraph to Clear Name

Two years after he was fired, former Fort Myers police Chief Doug Baker wants people to know he is not a liar. He was fired for allegedly lying during the internal investigation into NFL player Nate Allen's wrongful arrest, but a polygraph completed earlier this month found no deception.


The polygraph was completed prior to his scheduled deposition in Allen's federal civil rights lawsuit against the city of Fort Myers, which was settled last week for $440,000, and Baker released the results to the media on Monday.


Polygraph results are generally not admissible in Florida courts, but Baker's attorney requested one anyway. Baker said he wanted a chance to tell his side of a story that has been hanging over his head since August 2015. "It was important for me to have that (polygraph) to show that I was being truthful," Baker said. "It eats at me."


In February 2015, Fort Myers police officers arrested Allen under the wrong law and continued to hold him in custody for an additional two hours after they realized a mistake had been made.


But Baker's undoing came down to a 32-second telephone conversation he said he had with Capt. Melvin Perry, who has since been placed on administrative leave. Perry is one of four members of the department placed on leave the same day the Freeh Report revealed allegations of police offering protection to a drug trafficking ring known for killing witnesses.


During the 2015 internal affairs investigation, Baker said he told Perry to release Allen immediately. In an interview prior to the Oct. 6 polygraph, Baker told the examiner that Perry was uninformed about Allen's arrest, and he instructed Perry to "get up to speed," make a plan and call him back.


But Perry denied that conversation ever took place at the time Baker said it did. His phone records show a missed call. Baker said his records show a 32-second call, but that was never included in the internal affairs report.


Baker was fired on Aug. 14, 2015, about two weeks after the investigation had come to a close. Baker feels he lost his job based on Perry's statement about the phone call, but he's unable to explain the phone records that support Perry's statement.


"I can't dispute what the phone records say. What I can say is the phone records are wrong," he said. "I don't know how that happened. I can't explain it."


Source: www.news-press.com



'I Just Want My Life Back' says Ex-armored Car Employee After Charge Dropped

ANN ARBOR, MI - Prosecutors have dropped an embezzlement charge facing a former armored car employee. The Washtenaw County Prosecutor's office dismissed the charge against Marcey Dewberry, of Westland, in March, according to court records.


Dewberry, who maintained his innocence, said he's relieved the charges against him were dropped, but is frustrated by the impact the criminal accusation has had on his life. "The charge ruined my life for a full year and has cost me job opportunities because I was accused of stealing," he said Wednesday, May 23. "The evidence against me was weak and I passed a lie detector. I just want my life back."


Dewberry, 26, was accused of taking a deposit bag from a restaurant while he was working for an armored car service on June 20, 2017, records show. The bag with an undisclosed amount of cash reportedly went missing after it had been turned over to the armored car service he was working for, police said. "Certain information was developed in the case and, in the interest of justice, the charge was dismissed," Chief Assistant Prosecuting Attorney Steve Hiller said. The Prosecutor's Office declined to elaborate further on the reasoning of the dismissal.


The manager of the restaurant, located in the 2300 block of West Stadium Boulevard of Ann Arbor, contacted police to report that one of their deposit bags was missing, police said. Dewberry was developed as a suspect by police and charged with one felony count of embezzlement between $1,000 and $20,000. Dewberry believes he was targeted for prosecution in the theft only because he was the last employee on the armored truck route that day. "There are so many hands that touch the money along the way, they couldn't tell who took it, so they targeted me," he said. "I didn't do anything and what bothers me most is I never got an apology from anyone after the charge was dropped."


Source: https://www.mlive.com



Ex-Fort Myers Police Chief Fired for Lying Takes Polygraph to Clear Name

Two years after he was fired, former Fort Myers police Chief Doug Baker wants people to know he is not a liar. He was fired for allegedly lying during the internal investigation into NFL player Nate Allen's wrongful arrest, but a polygraph completed earlier this month found no deception. The polygraph was completed prior to his scheduled deposition in Allen's federal civil rights lawsuit against the city of Fort Myers, which was settled last week for $440,000, and Baker released the results to the media on Monday.


Polygraph results are generally not admissible in Florida courts, but Baker's attorney requested one anyway. Baker said he wanted a chance to tell his side of a story that has been hanging over his head since August 2015. "It was important for me to have that (polygraph) to show that I was being truthful," Baker said. "It eats at me."


In February 2015, Fort Myers police officers arrested Allen under the wrong law and continued to hold him in custody for an additional two hours after they realized a mistake had been made.


But Baker's undoing came down to a 32-second telephone conversation he said he had with Capt. Melvin Perry, who has since been placed on administrative leave. Perry is one of four members of the department placed on leave the same day the Freeh Report revealed allegations of police offering protection to a drug trafficking ring known for killing witnesses.


During the 2015 internal affairs investigation, Baker said he told Perry to release Allen immediately. In an interview prior to the Oct. 6 polygraph, Baker told the examiner that Perry was uninformed about Allen's arrest, and he instructed Perry to "get up to speed," make a plan and call him back. But Perry denied that conversation ever took place at the time Baker said it did. His phone records show a missed call. Baker said his records show a 32-second call, but that was never included in the internal affairs report.


Baker was fired on Aug. 14, 2015, about two weeks after the investigation had come to a close. Baker feels he lost his job based on Perry's statement about the phone call, but he's unable to explain the phone records that support Perry's statement.


"I can't dispute what the phone records say. What I can say is the phone records are wrong," he said. "I don't know how that happened. I can't explain it."


Source: www.news-press.com


Prosecutors Drop Grant County Teacher's Child Seduction Charge After Polygraph Test

CONVERSE, Ind. - A Grant County teacher is no longer facing a child seduction charge following a polygraph test. Hueston was arrested on that charge in February after a 16-year-old girl accused him of fondling and touching her in 2016. Prosecutors say Hueston denied the charge and pleaded not guilty.


State police later administered a lie detector test that found that Hueston "truthfully answered the relevant question." The results of the test led prosecutors to drop the charge Tuesday.


"We were convinced that we could never carry our burden of proof in the case," said a prosecutor. "Therefore, the only reasonable and correct course of action was to dismiss the charge." Prosecutors say they do not plan on charging the teen with false reporting since there is no evidence that they have seen to prove that she lied to police.


"By itself, the polygraph examination report is not proof that the child lied," said a prosecutor. "Of course, the polygraph result is not admissible in any trial other than Mr. Hueston's trial."


Hueston was placed on administrative leave from Oak Hill High School as a result of his arrest. It's unclear at this time if or when he will be reinstated. The Oak Hill United School Corporation says it is aware that Hueston's charge has been dropped. That information will be considered at a school board meeting.


Source: www.cbs4indy.com



N.J. Supreme Court Upholds Lie Detector Tests for Sex Offenders

TRENTON -- Sex offenders can be subjected to lie detector tests as a condition of parole in New Jersey as long as they are made clearly aware of their rights against self-incrimination, the state's highest court ruled on Monday.


In a unanimous ruling, the New Jersey Supreme Court upheld the practice but called for better regulations to make sure the state Parole Board, which administers the polygraph tests, isn't violating parolees' rights under the Fifth Amendment.


Under state law, sex offenders sentenced to lifetime monitoring can be subjected to the examinations, which are used to help parole officers determine whether the offenders are adhering to treatment plans and the terms of their parole.


Five convicted sex offenders challenged the use of polygraph tests, arguing the tests amounted to coerced interrogations and pointing to research questioning their scientific validity.


Writing for the court, Justice Faustino Fernandez-Vina said the state's interest in making sure sex offenders are adhering to the conditions of treatment and parole "outweighs the parolees' limited right to privacy."


The justice also noted that a polygraph test alone can't be the basis of a criminal charge.


However, the court ordered the Parole Board to revise regulations to explicitly state that offenders can invoke their Fifth Amendment rights without repercussions if the answer to a particular question could spark another criminal investigation. Fifth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution gives any citizen the right to refuse to testify against his- or herself.


Michael Woyce, an attorney who represented the sex offenders, who were identified only by their initials in court documents, said he was pleased the court recognized Fifth Amendment concerns regardless of the underlying charges.


"(The Fifth Amendment) is a protection we all have," he said. "I think what the court is saying is that just because you've been convicted once, you don't lose that protection."


Source: www.nj.com